Spanish ‘twin’ for Bristol Aquarium

Bristol Aquarium is to be twinned with one of Europe’s largest aquariums as part of a new initiative.

The Harbourside wildlife attraction has announced plans to set up a twinning agreement with Barcelona Aquarium.

As part of the new agreement the two aquariums will work closely together on a variety of captive breeding programmes and aquarists from both sites will make regular visits to share information and new ideas.

The two aquariums are also planning to run a joint schools competition later in the year.

Bristol Aquarium’s Susie Merelie said: “We’re delighted to have been able to set up a ‘twinning’ programme with one of Europe’s best known aquariums”

[pullquote type=left]We’re delighted to have been able to set up a ‘twinning’ programme with one of Europe’s best known aquariums[/pullquote]

“Over the coming weeks and months we will arrange familiarisation visits for key personnel and finalise joint breeding programmes and other activities.

“Fortunately our curator, Dan de Castro, is Spanish and has already built up a good working relationship with his counterpart at Barcelona.

“Having the opportunity to work with one of the largest aquariums in Europe is great for us and can only help our ongoing ambition to make Bristol Aquarium a truly world-class visitor attraction,” she added.

Opened in 1995, Barcelona Aquarium is widely regarded as one of the best aquariums in Europe and the world’s leading aquarium showcasing Mediterranean species.

Built over three floors the aquarium is home to more than 11,000 individual marine and freshwater species representing over 450 different species. At its heart is the giant 4.5 million litre ‘Oceanarium’ display, complete with an 80-metre underwater walkthrough tunnel.

[pullquote type=right]This will allow both aquariums to display a wider number of species which, although common to one site, may be very unusual for the other![/pullquote]

“For me the chance to work with the aquarists and marine experts from Barcelona is very exciting,” said Bristol Aquarium curator Dan de Castro.

“As part of the twinning we will also be sharing different fish species between both sites. This will allow both aquariums to display a wider number of species which, although common to one site, may be very unusual for the other!” he added.